Stymied by Diversity Hiring

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Most managers seem to recognize, or at least say they<br clear="none" /> recognize, the value of hiring people different from themselves, but nearly 30 percent do not know how to do it effectively, according to a survey of more than 2,500 senior HR executives in North America by Novations Group. The firm asked respondents to characterize their management's attitude toward diversity hiring. <br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> Responses to the question, "With respect to considering diversity when recruiting new employees, which of the following best describes the attitude of managers in your organization?" were as follows:<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> &#x2022; Most managers recognize the value of hiring people different from themselves and do what they can to meet this objective: 50%<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> &#x2022; Most managers recognize the value of hiring people different from themselves but don't know how to do it effectively: 29%<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> &#x2022; Most managers don't see the value in hiring people different from themselves, but still cooperate with HR's effort to meet this objective: 12% <br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> &#x2022; Most managers see no value in hiring people different from themselves and make little effort to meet this objective: 8%<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> &#x2022; Most managers openly resist diversity in hiring: 1%