Are Employees Really Working at Work?

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Since 2000, the Internet has been credited with boosting work performance and productivity, according to annual surveys by the USC Annenberg School Center for the Digital Future.<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> Some 57 percent of respondents said the Internet had improved their productivity "a lot" or "somewhat" in 2000. That opinion was shared by 71 percent of respondents in 2007.<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> Still, an almost-consistent 5 percent of respondents each year argued that the Internet had worsened their job performance "a lot" or "somewhat."<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> The Internet affords the means for instant communication, the flexibility to work from remote locations and still be a contributing member of a team, and myriad avenues of entertainment and diversion. However, the advantages also carry disadvantages, for employers and employees alike.<br clear="none" /> <br clear="none" /> <a href="http://www.adweek.com" target="_blank">&#x2014; Nielsen Business Media</a>