Coaching Tips for Winning the Email Marketing Game

Author: 
Campaigner Email Marketing

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This year’s March Madness tournament is underway, and 68 college basketball teams from across the U.S. are once again competing for the top title in the NCAA. Big names like Duke often end up on top, but a handful of underdog wins in the tournament’s 78-year history goes to show that with the right techniques, the little guys can be just as powerful.

The same idea goes for email marketing. Regardless of the size of your brand or subscriber base, the same principles always apply in order to run successful campaigns. Here are three key coaching tips so your campaigns can score big. 

Shoot from outside the box. Every now and then you may want to take a radically different approach to your marketing efforts without affecting your entire customer base. This could be anything from a new subject line or graphics to fresh formatting or content. To ensure you hit the basket when taking these outside shots, run an A/B test on small groups of contacts first and see what feedback you get.

Separate the starters from the second string. Don’t waste precious resources by sending messages to contacts who rarely or never interact with your emails. Not only are they likely irritated by your messages, but, also, consistent unopened messages can cause some ISPs to start flagging your emails as spam. Use engagement scoring to identify that core group of contacts that regularly interacts with your marketing message, and take advantage of this information to boost your delivery rates and reach more inboxes.

Take advantage of the bonus. When your basketball team is in bonus, making a free throw will get you another shot at scoring. When it comes to email marketing, offering bonuses and special offers can help you boost your customer count the same way a bonus period can help teams boost their scores. Take it further by personalizing the offers based on geolocation.

Campaigner’s email marketing services help turn contact lists into customers – and emails into revenue.